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Marine & Dry Dock Repair

Marine & Dry Dock RepairWhen marine vessels of all shapes and sizes arrive in dry dock for repairs, climate control can become the new best friend. When surface preparation is under way or interior work is conducted, dehumidification and temperature control can aid in many ways:

  • Improve application of steel surface paint
  • Control/reduce moisture
  • Maintain surface temperatures
  • Condition interior spaces during renovation/repairs

 The Benefits of Using Climate Control:

  • Provide ideal environment and control all climate settings for blasting & coating operations
  • Eliminate weather delays
  • Conform to coating spec requirements (i.e. Navy)
  • Improve life of coatings
  • Safe and effective work environment

 

We Help get the Ship out to Sea, Not at the Dock

The interior of a tent on board a marine vessel undergoing repairs.  Along the walls you can see the ducting from the dehumidification and climate control equipment.

When DRYCO is involved on a project with a ship or Naval vessel, the main goal of the Captain or owner is to make repairs quickly and effectively.  They want to get the ship back out to sea to perform its duties.  Climate control not only helps the contractors who are performing repairs stay on schedule but in some cases it is critical to the application of materials.  In the case of refinishing deck surfaces, contractors will erect a temporary tent and blast, strip materials and reapply a coating.  This is all possible by holding specific temperatures and humidity levels inside the tent. There is a greater explanation involved but the point is that by using dehumidification, heating and creating a proper air air flow inside a containment, scheduled work stays on…well, schedule.  We like to think that because of DRYCO ships can sail the seas and not be stuck on a dock waiting for better weather.